David Freake Running Race

David Freake, Elite Runner and LeanFit Ambassador

With the Spring season just around the corner, races are on the mind’s of beginner, advanced, and elite runners alike!

Whether you’re prepping for your first 5K, looking to knock out your 10K goal, or intensively preparing for your half or full marathon, a well-rounded training plan is the key to success.

Keep in mind everyone is at a different place in their training and has their own individual goals. This is a guideline, and may need to be altered accordingly.

If you have any questions or comments about your training, please leave them in the comments below!

10K Training Program (4 Weeks – Race Day)

4 Weeks Out

  • Monday – 30-45 minutes easy
  • Tuesday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Wednesday – 10 minutes easy then 15 minutes at the goal pace you want to run at the race followed by a 10 minute cool down.
  • Thursday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Friday – 45-60 minutes of easy running
  • Saturday – Completely OFF
  • Sunday – Long Run
  • TIP: Here you want to cover at least the 10K distance and if possible go as far as 15K at a nice and easy pace, one you can hold a conversation running at.

3 Weeks Out

  • Monday – 45-60 minutes easy
  • Tuesday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Wednesday – 15 minutes easy then 2X10 minutes at the goal pace you want to run at the race with 3 minutes recovery between the 10 minute intervals. Follow with a 10 minute cool down.
  • Thursday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Friday – 50 minutes of easy running
  • Saturday – Completely off
  • Sunday – Long Run
  • TIP: This week aim to go between 9K and 12K at a nice and easy pace, one you can hold a conversation running at.

2 Weeks Out

  • Monday – 45 minutes easy
  • Tuesday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Wednesday – 10 minutes easy then 20-25 minutes at the goal pace you want to run at the race followed by a 10 minute cool down.
  • TIP: If you are hoping to run under an hour for the race then do 25 minutes, if you plan to run 10K over an hour aim for 20 minutes at goal pace/effort.

  • Thursday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Friday – 60 minutes of easy running
  • Saturday – Completely OFF
  • Sunday – Long Run
  • TIP: Here you want to cut back a little and run around 8-10K at a nice and easy pace, one you can hold a conversation running at.

1 Week Out

  • Monday – 30 minutes easy
  • Tuesday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Wednesday – 10 minutes easy then 10 minutes at the goal pace you want to run at the race followed by a 10 minute cool down.
  • Thursday – OFF or Cross Training
  • Friday – 20 minutes of easy running
  • Saturday – Completely OFF
  • Sunday – Race Day! Go have fun and find your squad after the race for high fives!

Race Week & Day Tips

There’s several areas to focus on during the week leading up to the run. These will help to ensure you’re fully packed and prepared with the proper foods and hydration to do your very best. These essentials make race day less stressful, and more enjoyable.

Race Week Montage

Hydration

In the week leading up to your big race it’s important to not experiment with anything new in terms of hydration. Use the same hydration strategy that has worked in your training through your race preparation.

On the day of or two days before your race, try to limit your coffee and alcohol intake as these tend to have diuretic effects and can cause slight dehydration. Aim for at least 8-10 cups (250ml) of water daily and increase that if you are training in warmer conditions or are sweating often.

Nutrition

In the week’s before your race, experiment with foods that work well for you before you run. Make sure you are eating a balanced diet and hitting your personal macro and micro nutrient requirements to keep yourself in a state of homeostasis with a healthy energy balance.

The meal that is most important to dial in is the one right before you run. Here you need to focus on having something nutritious that sits well in your stomach and doesn’t cause any digestive distress. Shoot for something with complex carbohydrates that tend to burn more slowly then refined ones and keep insulin levels steady. Pair this carbohydrate with a serving of healthy fats and some quality protein.

Two of my pre-run staples are a couple pieces of Ezekiel or Whole Wheat bread, with a tablespoon of natural nut butter and a LeanFit Whey Isolate Shake, or a cup of oatmeal with a natural nut butter mixed in, and a scoop of Whey Protein or a glass of skim milk.

Race Day Rehearsal

Normally race’s take place on a Sunday. One Sunday a week before your race, do a mini dress rehearsal. Go to bed early and set your alarm for the same time you will want to get up race morning. Lay out your race clothing and sneakers before you go to bed. When you wake up, do everything the same as you will on race day. Eat the same food and drink the same liquids.

After that, go for an easy run that’s the same distance that you will be racing (the exception is if your running a half or full marathon, in which case just do your normal training run that you have on your schedule/training plan)

Race Goals

Before you go into the race make sure you write down your A, B and C goals for the race. Your C goal is to finish and have fun, your B goal will be a time you think you can achieve if the weather isn’t ideal and you run into a few tough spots on the course where you have to dig deep. The A goal is a time you think is realistic if everything goes great and you have an awesome day out there.

Race Strategy

It’s easy to get really excited as the gun goes off and adrenaline is pumping. Be sure to stay calm and remember it’s a long race, you want to budget your energy accordingly.

I always advise my athletes to go out conservatively for the first couple kilometers, or a few seconds slower then goal race pace and then once you get past the first 3rd of the race start picking it up to goal race pace. Then, if you are feeling good, pick it up entering the last 3rd of the race and run the last section with all you have.

It’s always possible to pick it up when you go out slow, but if you go out too hard it will be very difficult to regroup and stay on pace when you start to hurt aerobically in the last stages of the race.

Enjoy Yourself!

Running is supposed to be empowering and fun, so when you are out there on the course, take it all in, draw energy from the crowd cheering you on and take the time to enjoy the race.

When you cross the finish line make sure you give a competitor a high five and go find your friends and family. You did it, now go and celebrate!

If you’re in the lower mainland of B.C., register or head on down to support the Vancouver Sun Run 10K race! Team LeanFit and Elite Ambassador, David Freake, will be running and celebrating successes across the finish line.

David Freake

About the Author:

David Freake is an Elite Runner and LeanFit Ambassador from St. John’s, Newfoundland. By day, he works as an Account Manager for a pharmaceutical company, and any other time in between, he’s pounding pavement in his Brooks shoes. David competes both nationally & internationally as a distance runner over different distances on the track, roads and cross country. Check out his race highlights here.

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